Subject 2. Texts explained against the Arians, viz. Matt. xxviii. 18. Phil. ii. 9. .Eph. i. 20.

. 6, 7.

When the Word and Son hungered, wept, and was wearied, He acted as
our Mediator, taking on Him what was ours, that He might impart to us
what was His.

. 6.

{520} 1. AND in answer to the weak and human notions of the Arians, their supposing that the Lord is in want, when He says, Is given unto Me [Matt. xxviii. 18.], and I received, and if Paul says, Wherefore hath He highly exalted Him [Phil. ii. 9.], and He set Him at the right hand [Eph i. 20.], and the like, we must say, that our Lord, being Word and Son of God, bore a body, and became Son of Man, that, having become Mediator between God and men, He might minister [Note 1] the things of God to us, and ours to God. When then He is said to hunger and weep and weary, and to cry Eloi, Eloi, which are our human affections, He receives them from us and offers to the Father [Note 2], interceding for us, that in Him they may be annulled [Note 3]. And when it is said, All power is given unto Me, and I received, and Wherefore hath God highly exalted Him, these are gifts [Note 4] given from God to us through Him. For the Word was never in want [Note 5], nor came into being [Note 6]; nor again were men sufficient to minister [Note 7] these things for themselves, but through the Word they are given to us; therefore, as if given to Him, they are imparted to us. For this was the reason of His becoming man, that, as being given to Him, they might be transferred to us [Note 8]. For of such gifts mere [Note 9] man had not become worthy; and again the mere Word had not needed them [Note 10]; the Word then was united to us, and then imparted to us power, and highly exalted us [Note 11]. For the Word being in man, highly exalted man himself [Note 12]; and, when the Word was in man, man himself received. Since then, the Word being in flesh, man himself was exalted, and received power, therefore these things are referred to the Word, since they were given on {521} His account; for on account of the Word in man were these gifts [Note 13] given. And as the Word became flesh [John i. 14.], so also man himself received the gifts which came through the Word. For all that man himself has received, the Word is said to have received [Note 14]; that it might be shewn, that man himself, being unworthy to receive, as far as his own nature is concerned, yet has received because of the Word become flesh. Wherefore if any thing be said to be given to the Lord, or the like, we must consider that it is given, not to Him as needing it, but to man himself through the Word. For every one who intercedes for another, receives the gift in his own person [Note 15], not as needing, but on his account for whom he intercedes.

. 7.

2. For as He takes our infirmities, not being infirm [Note 16], and hungers not hungering, but offers up what is ours that it may be abolished, so the gifts which come from God instead of our infirmities, doth He too Himself receive, that man, being united to Him, may be able to partake them. Hence it is that the Lord says, All things whatsoever Thou hast given Me, I have given them [John xvii. 7-9.], and again, I pray for them. For He prayed for us, having taken on Him what is ours, and He gave while He received. Since then, the Word being united to man himself [Note 17], the Father, regarding Him, vouchsafed to man to be exalted, to have all power and the like, therefore are referred to the Word, and are as if given to Him, all things which through Him we receive. For as He for our sake became man, so we for His sake are exalted. It is no extravagance then, if, as for our sake He humbled Himself, so also for our sake He is said to be highly exalted. So He gave to Him [Phil. ii. 9.], that is, "to us for His sake;" and He highly exalted Him, that is, "us in Him." And the Word Himself, when we are exalted, and receive, and are succoured, as if He Himself were exalted and received and were succoured, gives thanks to the Father, referring what is ours to Himself, and saying, All things, whatsoever Thou hast given Me, I have given unto them [John xvii. 7. 8.] [Note A].

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Footnote

A. Similar as these two sections are to passages in the foregoing Orations, as shewn in the marginal references, yet many distinctions might be drawn between them; e.g. there is no mention of man’s [theopoiesis] here, or of his persevering abidance in holiness, ([hina diameinui],) which occurs so frequently above. Above. [diamone] is used infr. p. 552. Again, the use of [diakonein, charismata] is novel, &c.
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Margin Notes

1. [diakonei].
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2. pp. 23, 291, 294.
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3. p. 447. and note U. p. 449.
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4. [charismata].
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5. p. 242 init.
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6. pp. 242, 374, 377.
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7. [diakonesai].
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8. pp. 240, 245.
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9. [psilos].
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10. pp. 250, 455.
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11. pp. 239, 240.
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12. [ton anthropon].
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13. [charismata].
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14. p. 455.
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15. [autos].
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16. pp. 359-444, &c.
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17. [toi anthropoi].
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